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The "jump" element of this rule was

BEREA, Ohio - Desmond Bryant knew he had to make some major changes to his lifestyle. [url=http://www.authenticrocketsproshop.com/Chris-Paul-Jersey/]Chris Paul Rockets Jersey[/url] . Really, he had no choice or there could be devastating consequences. "A heart surgery will make you kind of realize you need to start doing things right, especially diet wise," Bryant said. "Ive really cleaned things up a little bit. So far, so good." Bryants comeback from a major health scare continued Wednesday when the Browns defensive lineman returned practiced for the first time since having a procedure in December to fix an irregular heartbeat a condition he has had for years that led to him having his first season with Cleveland cut short. On Dec. 6, Bryant underwent a cardiac ablation, an operation that involves a catheter being inserted to destroy a small area of bad heart tissue. The 6-foot-6, 310-pounder had at least two episodes last season when his heart raced out of control, including once during an Oct. 3 game against Buffalo. Bryant was hospitalized overnight and the 29-year-old had a recurrence two months later following a home loss to Jacksonville. It was then that Bryant, who was forced to leave a 2012 game for Oakland with a fast heart rate and light-headedness, was advised to undergo the ablation. "I felt like after I experienced what I did on the field that it was finally time to do something to fix that," Bryant said. "So while it was a trying time, I was also excited to get this procedure done and put this behind me. Since then, Ive been training and feeling real well. "Im back. Im healthy." Bryant missed the first minicamp practice on Tuesday for personal reasons, but joined his teammates for their second workout, which was held inside again because of rain and wet grounds. Bryant was welcomed back by everyone, including linebacker Quentin Groves, who also had a heart ablation in 2008. Groves condition was first diagnosed when he was in college but he didnt decide to have the procedure until it was spotted again at the NFL combine. "Its kind of scary not knowing what it is," Groves said. "The way it was explained to me when I had my procedure, the doctor told me one day you could not wake up. I was like, Well, OK, if I was your son, what would you do? He said, I would have the procedure done. "Anytime someone plays with your heart, youre kind of scared." Groves spoke with Bryant before he had the operation, and joked that he had to comfort his big teammate. "Des is a big baby. I have to rock him to sleep at night. No, Im just kidding," Groves said. "I just told him, Its a fairly simple procedure. I recommend you get it done. Im proud that you got it done before it became a problem for you." Bryant wasnt anxious about the operation. He was most fearful during the episodes when his heart raced. "I would feel like I had a fast heart rate and the next thing I know I was going to the hospital," he said. "That was the only real scary thing." Bryant was one of the biggest off-season acquisitions in 2013 by the Browns, who signed him to a five-year, $34 million free agent contract. Bryant had an immediate impact, recording two sacks and a career-high 10 tackles in the opener against Miami. He was Clevelands best defensive lineman through four games, but his production fell off sharply following his hospitalization. He finished with 3 1/2 sacks in 12 games. Bryant, though, doesnt know if theres a direct correlation between his drop-off and heart ailment. Hes excited about the new defensive scheme brought in by coach Mike Pettine. "Theyve got a few wrinkles here and there that kind of switch things up that really make it challenging for offences," he said. "I cant wait to continue to grow and learn in this system and see where this will take us." Does he fit in it? "Absolutely," he said with a smile. "Im a good fit for any defence." NOTES: TE Keavon Milton worked out with the offensive linemen for the first time. The 6-foot-4, 293-pounder wore No. 63 after wearing No. 83 on Tuesday. ... After briefly considering a name change, Browns safety Donte Whitner will not drop the W and go by Hitner. "I didnt want to go through changing my credit cards, mortgages and cars," he said. "I cant do all of this paperwork. For one letter change? Id rather not." ___ AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and http://twitter.com/AP_NFL [url=http://www.authenticrocketsproshop.com/Chris-Paul-Jersey/]Chris Paul Authentic Jersey[/url] . But defending champion Elena Vesnina of Russia held off a strong challenge to beat Shuai Peng of China 6-3, 6-4, and there was another hard-fought victory for 2012 runner-up Angelique Kerber of Germany, who defeated Alison Riske of the United States 7-6 (6), 6-4. [url=http://www.authenticrocketsproshop.com/Chris-Paul-Jersey/]Chris Paul Youth Jersey[/url] . And I wanted to take this opportunity to share some of my experiences gained through International competition and the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan. Seven NHL referees and six linesmen will be assigned upcoming games in Sochi by the IIHF as part of their 28-man officiating roster comprised of 14 refs and 14 linesmen. [url=http://www.authenticrocketsproshop.com/Chris-Paul-Jersey/]http://www.authenticrocketsproshop.com/Chris-Paul-Jersey/[/url] . The third-ranked Buckeyes were down eight points to Notre Dame with less than 2 minutes to play and their offence was nowhere to be found.Got a question on rule clarification, comments on rule enforcements or some memorable NHL stories? Kerry wants to answer your emails at cmonref@tsn.ca. In Sundays Blackhawks-Penguins game, Pittsburgh defenceman Brooks Orpik laid a huge hit on Chicagos Jonathan Toews. Now in my view, Orpik can be clearly seen leaving his feet while delivering a moderately high hit. Why wasnt there supplemental discipline, and should there have even been a penalty? I thought anytime you leapt or left your feet, a penalty is called! Am I missing something? Stu Alderson Stu: You and I are not the only ones missing something here as players continually elevate their posture and leave their feet at impact to deliver devastating hits. Dangerous and significant contact to the head of their opponent almost always results whenever a player leaves his feet to make a big hit. In the here and now, these hits are deemed "legal." With an eye firmly set on the end game, which I hope still remains to greatly reduce contact to the head and resulting concussions, it is irresponsible to continue down this path any longer. While each camp can passionately debate their respective position on whether to allow or eliminate high hits where significant contact to the head of an opponent results, I respectfully submit this issue should no longer be a matter of personal opinion. Instead, it should only be about "science." Through irrefutable medical evidence, we now know the short and long term effects of blows to the head. This road map can provide us with a clear picture of the end game! Brooks Orpik set up to deliver a body check as he slowed and glided toward Jonathan Toews in the corner. Toews sole intent was to advance the puck around the end wall. In doing so, Jonathan Toews lowered his body posturre to place him (and particularly his head) in a vulnerable position and must share the responsibility for the location of where he was hit. [url=http://www.authenticrocketsproshop.com/Chris-Paul-Jersey/]Chris Paul Swingman Jersey[/url]. The onus of "how" the contact was delivered and the "degree of force" utilized is exclusively on Brooks Orpik and taken into account by the referee to determine the legality of the check. No differently than the vast majority of current players, Brooks Orpik finished his hit on Jonathan Toews with considerable force as demonstrated by his upward launch with skates high off the ice. This intensified the velocity and violence of the hit regardless of whether Toews was in a vulnerable position or not. In many cases I would even suggest that an opponents apparent vulnerability is something a player will capitalize on to enhance the degree of force exerted through a hit. We certainly dont see many players let up! Rule 42.1 tells us that a minor or major shall be imposed on a player who "jumps into" an opponent. The "jump" element of this rule was once applied when a players skates lost contact with the ice. Charging is seldom called in the current era of the game, where players leave their feet with far more frequency in the act of delivering a body check than ever before. The most common "excuse" for not calling this infraction is that a players skates did not completely leave the ice prior to initiating body contact. This generous and liberal interpretation is extended to include times when the toe tip of one skate remains in contact with the ice at impact. Referees should be directed to impose a charging penalty in every case when a players skates leave the ice in the act of delivering a body check, period. It doesnt take a rocket scientist to see the end game; just a medical scientist! 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